Shiri Appleby Was Told She Was Too Flat for ‘Baywatch’

Shiri Appleby has been acting since age four when she appeared in a Raisin Brain commercial. Now, after cultivating an insanely impressive IMDB filmography—from “kid #1” on Who’s the Boss? to 61 episodes of Roswell to a ten-episode stint on ER—Appleby is starring as TV producer Rachel Goldberg on Lifetime’s UnREAL, a series that plays on the behind-the-scenes drama of a Bachelor-like show. It’s a grittier, darker character for the actress, who sees her recent credits as a new chapter in her three-decades-long career. (Need more proof? See her four-episode arc on Girls, which involved a deeply memorable if not disturbing sex scene with Adam Driver.) Here, as part of our recurring Explain Your IMDB series, Appleby recounts her memories from some of her most memorable roles (including a TV movie called Pizza My Heart.)

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

I Love You To Death, Millie, Girl In Park (1990)

“Lawrence Kasdan directed it. It was a scene with Tracey Ullman and I was a girl in the park. I remember my mom telling me it was a big deal movie because of who the actors were. Tracey Ullman was sitting in the park after finding out her husband has cheated on her, and this blonde boy and I ran over to her and asked if everything was okay. I thought I was a really serious actor and took it so seriously.”

Doogie Howser, M.D., Molly Harris (1993)

“It was a really big job for me. I remember auditioning on the 20th Century Fox lot. I knew it was a big deal because I had auditioned for it two or three times before that. I was about 11 years old and, to me, it was like starring in Gone With The Wind. It was a really fantastic work experience. There were a lot of scenes for me to play and I had to do a lot of emotions. I remember feeling really sad when the job was over because I felt like I really grew a lot. I know I was 11 years old, but I really felt that.”

ER, Ms. Murphy/Dr. Daria Wade (1994, 2008-09)

“I was in the pilot of ER, I played a 15-year-old pregnant girl they were treating. And then in the final season they were casting for interns. I had literally just been in the actual E.R. because I broke my pelvis and tailbone and told my agent, ‘I really want to be on ER‘ So then I was in the entire last season of the show. It was amazing. It was like being in graduate school for television. I learned that this is how you do television at the highest level.”

Baywatch, Jennie (1995)